Jolyn Wells-moran

Jolyn Wells-Moran is a studio and plein air oil painter in the western US and Baja Califonia, Mexico. She learned to draw and paint in college art courses in Design, Painting and Drawing. She taught drawing and watercolor courses for a community college in her twenties. In 2000, she began painting in oils and attended the Marchutz School of Drawing and Painting, Institute for American Universities, Aix-en-Provence, France. While there, she painted at Cezanne’s home in Aix, followed Van Gogh’s footsteps to Arles and St. Remy, painted other villages in the area, then in Monet’s Garden in Giverny. In 2016, she traveled and painted in Tuscany, Italy and in 2017, she painted in Oaxaca, Mexico. She has been painting yearly on the Baja Peninsula since 2006 and shows her work in Mangos Galeria in Baja Sur.

Her instructors have included such teaching artists as Michael Situ, Kathryn Stats, Eric Jacobsen, Mitch Albala, Jim Lamb, Jill Carver and others at Gage Academy of Art in Seattle, Whidbey Fine Art Studio and Pacific NW Art School, both on Whidbey Island, Washington. She studied with Slava Koralenkov, Russian impressionist, and Kathryn Townsend, who paints in a Russian impressionist style, in 2017 and 2018.

Wells-Moran has shown in many juried shows, including those run by the California Art Club, the City of Ventura, California and in Washington state in the annual Plein Air Washington Artists’ juried show at the American Art Co. in Tacoma, the Port Angeles Center for the Arts’ Plein Air Competition, the Kitsap Arts Festival, the Magnolia Arts Festival, the Shoreline Arts Festival, and the Edmonds Arts Festival, all in Washington. Most recently, she has been in three solo shows in Seattle, including ArtsWest in West Seattle last year and has won awards in local, national and international exhibitions. This month, she won the "Award of Excellence in Art" in an international landscape painting competition held by Light, Space & Time Gallery.

She is a Signature Member and President of the Puget Sound Group of Northwest Artists (PSGNA) – a professional artists’ juried group operating since 1928 -- and is a member of Women Artists of the West (WAOW), Plein Air Washington Artists (PAWA) and American Women Artists (AWA). This August, she had a solo show in Edmonds, Washington and now has several paintings in the Puget Sound Group’s Mercer Island Aljoya Show, a four months long, juried exhibit.

To visit her studio, email jowellsmoran@gmail.com. See Jolyn’s website at https://jwellsmoran.com.


Portfolio:

2019

This has been a very busy year of plein air and studio painting, this year in Mexico, Idaho and Washington. One large and current show will run into February, and now I’m painting in preparationfor galleries in both Mexico and Seattle.

Cottonwoods on the River “Cottonwoods on the River”

This painting is from Wood River in Central Idaho in October. It was warm, but the River was virtually a wind tunnel of frigid air when standing next to it. It felt like a forewarning of winter on the way. The cottonwoods were all short and bushy, but away from the river, they towered over all other trees.

Sage “Sage”

The sage in Idaho seemed to have family units, a few plants that nestled together with some rocks, claiming their territory on spacious fields of golden grass. Little other vegetation could be seen, except for an occasional rusty scrub. The terrain stretched for mile after mile.

 Entrance “ Entrance”

I don’t know where this road leads, but likely to a sizeable ranch. There were no towns, no houses within sight, no roadside businesses in the area, but only infrequent gated private roads which I understand belonged to cattle ranches. An occasional truck zoomed past on the highway, invariably driven by men in cowboy hats.

 Rambling “ Rambling”

After miles of dry golden grass, aspens, cottonwoods and some pine, this river invited us in for refreshment — if only for the eyes and mind.

Golden Days “Golden Days”

Here, the trees were as golden as the ground, although closer up, they were actually more yellow than ocher. The rock outcroppings gave away their glacial origins, and through nature’s mysterious creativity, provided a rugged counterpoint to the ocher tranquillity that pervaded.